Ice Globes Are the New Skincare Trend You Should Know About—And We Put Them to the Test

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Another day, another skin care trend. Here's everything you need to know about ice globes.

Rd Editor Tested with pink Ice GlobesCourtesy Jill Schildhouse

Some trends are so hot, they’re ice cold. That promise of a cooling sensation is exactly what attracted me to hop on the ice globes skin care train. I’ve read up on everything there is to know about the trendy product, including their ability to treat puffy eyes, reduce redness and leave skin feeling icy fresh. Intrigued by the fact that they could also give me a bit of a lymphatic facial massage without the intensity of a gua sha tool (which have historically led me to breakout), I put ice globes to the test.

With several ice globe tools on the market, I was drawn to the The Original Pink Ice Globe Facial Massager from Aceology. Spoiler: I won’t be using them just for summer cool downs, though that’s reason enough to hit “add to cart.”

What are ice globes?

Ice globes are round glass tools filled with liquid, providing a cooling effect when chilled in the fridge overnight. They boast multiple therapeutic effects, including reducing redness, puffiness, dark under-eyes and minimizing pores.

“Ice globes do help to lower inflammation, reduce puffiness and redness,” says Morgan Rackley, celebrity esthetician and owner of Luminous Skin Atlanta. “Think about it this way: If you sprained your ankle, you’re going to ice it to lower the inflammation, bruising and pain. The same goes for your facial skin, and using ice globes is a fun, quick way to accomplish those results.”

Rackley recommends her clients with inflamed acne use them twice a day to reduce pain, redness and inflammation. If you’re worried about acne, consider pairing your ice globes with one of the best moisturizers for oily skin.

How we tested the ice globes

Rd Ice Globes Jill Schildhouse JveditCourtesy Jill Schildhouse

The glass ice globes arrived in a beautifully packaged pink box, sitting snug and secure inside foam cutouts. They came with detailed directions and illustrations highlighting the two main ways to use them: 1) as a lifting facial massager to stimulate blood circulation, oxygenate skin and boost elasticity and 2) as a lymphatic facial massager to stimulate nerves, relieve tension, reduce future breakouts and release toxins.

Step 1: Chill the ice globes

Excited to put them to the test, I noticed a warning at the bottom stating, “Do not store Aceology Ice Globes in the freezer. Store in refrigerator or place into ice bowl or cool water before use.” Whew, crisis averted. After exploring their website, I learned that the specially designed liquid inside the ice globes doesn’t hold up when frozen. So I popped them in the fridge for 10 minutes, the suggested duration.

Step 2: Apply a serum

While I waited, I applied a face serum. The box states ice globes work best “after the removal of a hydrated mask or serum.” Rackley notes this is because the globes help products penetrate the skin rather than sit on top of it. This step is just as essential as getting your skin care routine order down pat so products work their magic by soaking into skin (though I certainly don’t suggest using it after slugging).

Step 3: Massage the ice globes over skin

I started using the ice globes by following the steps for the lymphatic facial massage. Starting at the center of my face, I rolled the globes outward, then down my neck. Rackley recommends keeping the ice globes moving instead of placing and holding them in one spot, as that can cause irritation. The ice globes effortlessly slid across my skin and the cooling sensation felt absolutely amazing on a 113-degree day.

I was looking rosier than usual that day, and I was delighted to see that my skin tone evened out when I was done using the globes. This is likely a combination of the ice globes’ cooling effect and the fact that my skin properly absorbed the serum.

I also tried the lifting facial massage method, which comprises upward strokes along the chin, cheekbones and above the brows. While I can’t say I noticed a visible lift in my skin after one use, it was certainly satisfying—and better than nothing. After a while, I went rogue with the lifting method, ad-libbing upward and downward strokes in every direction. Surprisingly, this was the winning ticket for me. Turns out, following the contours of my skin while paying attention to what areas needed lifting worked best.

The morning is my favorite time to use the ice globes because they instantly reduce puffiness while helping my skin look—and feel—more awake. Per Rackley’s recommendation, I cleaned the ice globes with 70% alcohol after each session. This ensures my new skincare tools are clean and ready for future use. I also store my them in the foam cutouts they arrived in to keep them safe.

Product features

One of my favorite features of the Aceology ice globes is their weight. They feel extremely durable and strong in my hands and on my face, allowing me to easily apply the perfect amount of pressure. Here’s what else I love about them—and features to consider:

Pros

  • Provides an at-home, spa-like facial massage
  • Accelerates skin product absorption
  • Reduces redness, puffiness, pigmentation and dark under-eyes
  • Minimizes pores
  • Reviewers mention the ice globes also ease pain from headaches and migraines

Cons

  • Not safe to place in the fridge overnight and not freezer safe
  • Must be handled with extreme care as they’re prone to slipping out of hands after applying a serum or moisturizer
  • 10 minutes in the fridge wasn’t long enough for me, so I doubled the time to ensure they stayed cool during my facial massage

What other reviewers had to say

Img 6264 Rd Ice Globes Jill Schildhouse JveditCourtesy Jill Schildhouse

Scroll through Acelogy’s product page and you’ll notice one five-star review after another, accompanied by plenty of happy emojis.

Vicki writes, “Who knew I needed such a tool? These are excellent for removing the puffiness under my eyes in the morning, and they feel great to use too! Definitely keep them in the fridge for an extra shot of cool to wake you up. Love them, and don’t know how I ever did without them!”

Natasha calls them a “game changer,” especially when used in conjunction with the brand’s face sheet mask.

And Marisa shares, “Absolutely love these little gems, they feel amazing and de-puff tired eyes and tone the skin like magic.”

Final verdict

I can confirm that ice globes are not one of those scary beauty trends that are downright dangerous. They deliver on their promise to reduce puffiness and redness. Plus, they increase circulation. They’re so satisfying to use that I look forward to my morning ice globe session every day.

Even if you only have a few minutes to spare, applying them to your face provides a luxurious at-home spa treatment. They’re basically the next best thing to getting a facial at a professional spa.

Where to buy ice globes

Rd Ecomm Aceology Ice Globes Via Aceology.comVia Merchant

Find your own ice globes online at Anthropologie and on the Aceology website, where they retail for $64, and treat yourself to a facial massage every day. Once you experience the way they bring relaxation to otherwise dull mornings, you won’t know how you woke up without them.

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Source: Morgan Rackley, celebrity esthetician and owner of Luminous Skin Atlanta

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Jill Schildhouse
As an editor at large for Reader's Digest, Jill Schildhouse is an expert in health and wellness, beauty, consumer products and product reviews, travel, and personal finance. She has spent the last 20 years as an award-winning lifestyle writer and editor for a variety of national print and digital publications.